Meningitis B is real

Facts moms and teens should know.

An uncommon but
potentially fatal disease

Meningococcal group B disease (also known as meningitis B) is an uncommon but serious disease that is caused by a bacterial infection of the lining of the brain and spinal cord. It can also cause a severe infection of the blood called meningococcal septicemia.

Meningitis B can strike otherwise healthy persons without warning and can progress quickly and be fatal, sometimes within 24 hours. Some survivors will have long-term physical and psychological disabilities, including brain damage, hearing loss and loss of limbs.

About 1 in 10 people
infected with meningitis B
could die, sometimes
within 24 hours

How meningitis B spreads

The bacteria that cause meningitis B live within the nose and throat and can be spread through close contact such as coughing, kissing or sneezing.

Certain everyday behaviors can increase the risk of getting meningitis B, particularly for teens and young adults, including:

Living in close
quarters

Sharing drinks,
eating utensils
and smoking devices

Coughing
and sneezing

Kissing

Smoking

About 1 in 10 young adults
carry the bacteria,* usually
without symptoms, and may
spread it to others

*In rare cases, the bacteria can invade the
body and lead to meningococcal disease.

Stay alert and act quickly

Initial symptoms may be mild, which is why people might confuse the early signs with the flu. However, symptoms can progress rapidly and can lead to death, sometimes within 24 hours.

Symptoms may include:

Sudden fever

Headache

Stiff neck

Additional symptoms may include, among others, nausea, vomiting, sensitivity of the eyes to light, confusion, and a rash (typically dark purple spots on the torso, arms, or legs).

If you are experiencing these symptoms or if you have been in close contact with someone who has meningitis, please contact your healthcare professional immediately.

Millions of teens and
young adults are not
vaccinated against
meningitis B

Recent cases and outbreaks of meningitis B

The majority of meningococcal disease cases (including MenB) are sporadic in nature, although occasionally outbreaks can occur, often at colleges/universities.

From 2011 to 2019, there were 50 cases, including 2 deaths, of meningitis B at colleges or universities in the following states: Rhode Island, California, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Oregon, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and New York.

Moms are getting the word out against meningitis B. Teens are getting BEXSERO.

Ask your teen's healthcare professional if vaccination with BEXSERO is right for them.

FIND OUT WHERE TO GET BEXSERO

Important Safety Information
About BEXSERO

  • Anyone who is allergic to the ingredients of BEXSERO or who had a severe allergic reaction after a previous dose should not receive BEXSERO
  • The tip caps of the prefilled syringes contain natural rubber latex, which may cause allergic reactions

Important Safety Information About BEXSEROImportant Safety Information
About BEXSERO

  • Anyone who is allergic to the ingredients of BEXSERO or who had a severe allergic reaction after a previous dose should not receive BEXSERO
  • The tip caps of the prefilled syringes contain natural rubber latex, which may cause allergic reactions
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding
  • Fainting can happen after getting BEXSERO. Sometimes people who faint can fall and hurt themselves. For this reason, your healthcare provider may ask you to sit or lie down for 15 minutes after receiving BEXSERO
  • The most common side effects are pain, redness or hardness at the injection site; muscle pain; fatigue; headache; nausea; and joint pain
  • Some individuals with weakened immune systems may have reduced immune responses to BEXSERO
  • Individuals with certain complement deficiencies and individuals receiving treatment that inhibits terminal complement activation (for example, eculizumab) are at increased risk for invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis group B even after being vaccinated with BEXSERO
  • Vaccination with BEXSERO may not result in protection in all vaccine recipients
  • Ask your healthcare provider about the risks and benefits of BEXSERO. Only a healthcare provider can decide if BEXSERO is right for you or your child